Gulf Coast Books

Reviews • Interviews • et Cetera

Reviews • Interviews • et Cetera

A Micro-Review of Tim Z. Hernandez's All They Will Call You

Matthew Krajniak

Tim Z. Hernandez’s first nonfiction work, All They Will Call You, is sharp and decidedly sobering. With this his sixth book, he investigates and reveals the stories of several of the twenty-eight Mexican deportees and four Americans who died in the worst…


Micro-Review: The Bees Make Money in the Lion by Lo Kwa Mei-en

Francine Conley

Lo Kwa Mei-en’s second collection of poems, The Bees Make Money in the Lion, is a loaded, postmodern experience. As if to channel versions of dystopia, Mei-en crafts poems that embrace the notion of discordance at its fullest. Most of the poems explore,…


Text and Body: A Review of WoO by Renee Angle

Aza Pace

Language itself forms the vital, visceral engine behind WoO, Renee Angle’s new collection of prose poetry. In this creative rewriting of the lost first draft of The Book of Mormon, Angle positions herself as “the bastard great-great-great-grandchild of…


Gulf Coast Editors' Best of 2016 List

The Editors

This year we asked our editors at Gulf Coast to list their five favorite books of 2016. They did just that, and the lists that they provided are in no particular order (it was hard enough for most of us to narrow it down to five). The rules also allowed…


Review: Lindsay Tigue's System of Ghosts

Dan Chu

"Tigue has a storyteller's eye for digging up the roots of trivia; she uses them to fasten together the poem’s emotional nerves."


Interview: Juan Gabriel Vásquez

Daniel Peña

Colombian writer Juan Gabriel Vásquez is at the forefront of decentering Colombian literature as it's commonly known: the magical realism, the polite political allegories, the associated orientalist gaze that threatens to broad-stroke all of Latin America…


Review: Fred Moten's The Service Porch

Henk Rossouw

On the sprung floors of the Eldorado Ballroom, in Houston’s Third Ward, before Fred Moten read from his new book The Service Porch, he began with a track by Carmen McRae, “Sometimes I’m Happy.” He let McRae’s riff on the jazz standard play through, without…